Dr. Isabel Thielmann

Research Group Leader
Independent Research Group Personality, Identity, and Crime
Criminology
+49 761 7081-324

Curriculum Vitae

Professional Appointments

  • 2022–present: Research group leader, Department of Criminology, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Crime, Security and Law, Freiburg, Germany

Professional Experience

  • 2014–2022: Researcher and lecturer at the Cognitive Psychology Lab, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
  • 2019–2021: Acting assistant professor at the Cognitive Psychology Lab, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
  • 2018: Postdoctoral fellow at the Amsterdam Cooperation Lab, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • 2014: Ph.D. student and researcher at the Judgment and Decision Making Lab, University of Mannheim, Germany

Education

  • 2012–2015: Ph. D. Psychology at the Center for Doctoral Studies in Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Mannheim, Germany (supervisor: Benjamin E. Hilbig)
  • 2010–2012: M.Sc. Psychology (Social and Cognitive Psychology), University of Mannheim, Germany (supervisors: Benjamin E. Hilbig, Inga Niedtfeld)
  • 2007–2010: B.Sc. Psychology, University of Mannheim, Germany (supervisors: Edgar Erdfelder, Dagmar Stahlberg)

Independent Research Group

Personality, Identity, and Crime

Independent Research Group more

Projects

KNOW-THYSELF: Increasing Self-Knowledge to Promote Moral Behavior

The functioning of societies and the quality of social relationships heavily de­pend on moral behaviors such as fair­ness, cooperation, and honesty, whereas immoral behaviors such as exploitation, dishonesty, and fraud come at tremen­dous societal cost. A long-standing issue in the social and behavioral… more

The Core Tendencies Underlying Individual Differences in Prosocial Behavior

Why are some people willing to help others but other people are (rather) not? Why do some people prefer to coop­er­ate with others whereas others are willing to exploit their interaction partners for personal gain? The project “The core tendencies underlying in­di­vid­ual differences in prosocial behavior,”… more

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